World Brain Day – #PDchallenge

#PDchallenge

Lets Shake the Parkinson’s Disease

World Brain Day 2020

#Parkinsons

Every year July 22nd is commemorated as WORLD BRAIN DAY.  Annually one disorder will be highlighted to increase the awareness of the disorder.  World Brain Day 2020 is dedicated to raising awareness for Parkinson’s Disease, a neurodegenerative brain disorder affecting more than 70 lakh people of all ages worldwide.   This year, World Federation of Neurology and International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society have joined together to end #parkinsons.

In this context, here in India, we are doing an active Parkinson’s Disease awareness campaign in the form of #PDchallenge.  The challenge is open to all patients, caregivers, friends, health care workers and everyone across.  The primary goal is to create awareness about Parkinson’s Disease.  Please do a brief video about your active movements or agility and challenge your family members, friends, colleagues to show their agility. Come lets create awareness about Parkinson’s disease and remove the myths about it.  Let’s create awareness by challenging our friends and relatives

10 things about Parkinson’s Disease for this World Brain Day:

  1. Parkinson’s Disease is neurodegenerative disease affecting the brain
  2. More than 70 Lakh people of all age groups affected by Parkinson’s Disease Worldwide.
  3. Parkinson’s Disease classically causes Slowness, Stiffness, Tremors and Balance problems.
  4. Mood changes, Anxiety, Depression, reduced smelling ability, Sleep disturbances, Urinary issues, Constipation, can also be affected.
  5. The Scare of the name “PARKINSON’S DISEASE”, make many people to loose hope in life.
  6. Parkinson’s disease is treatable
  7. People affected with Parkinson’s disease can lead a near normal quality of life.
  8. Good treatment options are available including mediations, injections and surgeries.  
  9. Active life style and Exercises form the most important part of management of Parkinson’s Disease.
  10. Come on the World Brain Day, “Lets Shake the Parkinson’s”
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Parkinsons diseaseAwareness

Destination Unknown – My Journey with Parkinson’s – An Autobiography by Rajeev K Gupta

Destination Unknown – My Journey with Parkinson’s

Destination Unknown – My Journey with Parkinson’s, is an autobiography of Mr. Rajeev K Gupta, who is diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease.   The book fills a long overdue void about personal experiences about Parkinson’s Disease, especially from Indian Context.  It goes through the various phases from, ‘Overcoming the Shock’ attached with diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease in a young active professional life.  The story leads on to explain the “Million Dollar Decision” on how and when to reveal the diagnosis to the family members and on professional front.  It also gives insights about how to cope with the diagnosis, adapt and overcome, to win over this ‘Mental Game’.  Mr. Gupta, further goes into the depth of various treatments he received, their benefits / limitations.  Later, he continues on his decision on ‘Deep Brain Stimulation’ surgery and his whole experience from the point of considering it to the post-surgery outcomes.   The book also gives a Q&A section, which will be helpful for all Parkinson’s disease patients, to understand about Parkinson’s disease and its treatment.  Overall, a must read for every Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease Patients and their families.   The Book is currently available on various online sellers including Amazon, Kobo, Google Play books and on publishers site (Notion Press).

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Chorea

Huntington’s Disease Awareness Month and Clinic

Huntington’s disease patients and families require special attention and care. Month of ‘May’ is #HDawareness month. There are various activities going on world wide during this #Lockdown time to create more awareness about #Huntingtonsdisease.

We are running the special Huntington disease clinic every fourth Wednesday of the month. This is a FREE CLINIC for Huntington’s disease patients and families. Dr. Prashanth LK is European Huntington Disease Network Associated member and credentialized investigator of Huntington Study Group.

Huntington disease is named after George Huntington (April 9, 1850 – March 3, 1916) was an American physician from Long Island, New York who contributed the clinical description of the disease. Dr. Huntington wrote his paper “On Chorea” when he was 22 years old, and was first published in the Medical and Surgical Reporter of Philadelphia on April 13, 1872.

Huntington’s disease usually causes movement, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances with a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms. Which symptoms appear first varies greatly among affected people. During the course of the disease, some disorders appear to be more dominant or have a greater effect on functional ability.

George Huntington. Copyright – HDSA

Movement disorders

The movement disorders associated with Huntington’s disease can include both involuntary movement problems and impairments in voluntary movements, such as:

  • Involuntary jerking or writhing movements (chorea)
  • Muscle problems, such as rigidity or muscle contracture (dystonia)
  • Slow or abnormal eye movements
  • Impaired gait, posture and balance
  • Difficulty with the physical production of speech or swallowing

Impairments in voluntary movements — rather than the involuntary movements — may have a greater impact on a person’s ability to work, perform daily activities, communicate and remain independent.

Cognitive Symptoms (Memory related)

Cognitive impairments often associated with Huntington’s disease include:

  • Difficulty organizing, prioritizing or focusing on tasks
  • Lack of flexibility or the tendency to get stuck on a thought, behavior or action (perseveration)
  • Lack of impulse control that can result in outbursts, acting without thinking and sexual promiscuity
  • Lack of awareness of one’s own behaviors and abilities
  • Slowness in processing thoughts or ”finding” words
  • Difficulty in learning new information

Behavioral Symptoms:

The most common psychiatric disorder associated with Huntington’s disease is depression. This isn’t simply a reaction to receiving a diagnosis of Huntington’s disease. Instead, depression appears to occur because of injury to the brain and subsequent changes in brain function. Signs and symptoms may include:

  • Feelings of irritability, sadness or apathy
  • Social withdrawal
  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue and loss of energy
  • Frequent thoughts of death, dying or suicide

Other common psychiatric disorders include:

  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder — a condition marked by recurrent, intrusive thoughts and repetitive behaviors
  • Mania, which can cause elevated mood, overactivity, impulsive behavior and inflated self-esteem
  • Bipolar disorder — a condition with alternating episodes of depression and mania

In addition to the above symptoms, weight loss is common in people with Huntington’s disease, especially as the disease progresses.

Symptoms of juvenile Huntington’s disease

The start and progression of Huntington’s disease in younger people may be slightly different from that in adults. Problems that often present themselves early in the course of the disease include:

Behavioral changes

  • Loss of previously learned academic or physical skills
  • Rapid, significant drop in overall school performance
  • Behavioral problems

Physical changes

  • Contracted and rigid muscles that affect gait (especially in young children)
  • Changes in fine motor skills that might be noticeable in skills such as handwriting
  • Tremors or slight involuntary movements
  • Seizures
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